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What Your Dog's Poop Color Says About Their Health


We see a LOT of dog poop on a daily basis, so much so that you kind of get used to the sight of it and start rating them out of amusement (swirls are almost a perfect 10!) As a pet parent, you might not be so enthusiastic about looking at your dog's poop, but it can tell you a lot about their health and well-being. Here are some common poop colors and what they mean:

  • Brown: This is the normal color of healthy poop. It means your dog is eating a balanced diet and digesting it well.

  • Green: This could indicate that your dog has eaten grass or other plants, which is not harmful in small amounts. However, it could also mean that your dog has a bacterial infection or parasites, so you should consult your vet if the green poop persists or is accompanied by other symptoms.

  • Yellow: This could mean that your dog has a liver problem or a pancreatic disorder, which affects the production of bile. Bile is a fluid that helps digest fats and gives poop its brown color. Yellow poop could also be caused by eating too much fat or dairy products, which can upset your dog's stomach.

  • Black: This is a sign of bleeding in the upper digestive tract, such as the stomach or esophagus. The blood turns black when it mixes with stomach acid. This is a serious condition that requires immediate veterinary attention.

  • Red: This is a sign of bleeding in the lower digestive tract, such as the colon or rectum. The blood is fresh and has not been digested. This could be caused by an injury, an infection, a tumor, or a foreign object. This is also a serious condition that requires immediate veterinary attention.

  • White: This could mean that your dog has eaten too much bone or calcium, which can harden their poop and make it difficult to pass. It could also indicate a lack of bile, which could be due to a liver problem or a blockage in the bile ducts.

  • Grey: This could mean that your dog has a problem with their pancreas, which produces enzymes that help digest food. A lack of enzymes can cause malabsorption and maldigestion, resulting in grey, greasy, and foul-smelling poop.

As you can see, your dog's poop color can reveal a lot about their health status. However, you should not rely on poop color alone to diagnose your dog's condition. Always consult your vet if you notice any changes in your dog's poop color, consistency, frequency, or smell. And remember to always pick up after your dog!


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